In 2019, Cleveland was ranked the worst place in America for Black Women.

Research in 2019 found that Cleveland is the worst place in America for Black women in terms of Healthcare, Education, and Economics. 

While this research helped us understand the severity of what Cleveland is like for Black women, it didn't include any information on what life is like in Cleveland for the thousands of Black women living out their lives in our community. 

We decided to change that. We developed a survey designed to collect the experiences and perspectives of Black women in Cleveland. 

The response was overwhelming. Nearly 500 Black women shared their stories. Stories of targeting, harassment, exclusion, ignorance, and perseverance. 

The Problem

"I often wonder if my daughters will be able to stay here."

The Method

Research in 2019 found that Cleveland is the worst place in America for Black women in terms of Healthcare, Education, and Economics. 

While this research helped us understand the severity of what Cleveland is like for Black women, it didn't include any information on what life is like in Cleveland for the thousands of Black women living out their lives in our community. 

We decided to change that. We developed a survey designed to collect the experiences and perspectives of Black women in Cleveland. 

The response was overwhelming. Nearly 500 Black women shared their stories. Stories of targeting, harassment, exclusion, ignorance, and perseverance. 

"I am a classroom teacher. A white teacher confused me with another teacher, came into my room, while I was teaching, insulted me and swore at me in front of my students and left. When I reported her to the administration, I was asked if I was overreacting and if I could just forgive her for the sake of the team."

"I am an asthmatic, had severe bronchitis during a winter storm. Drove to clinic barely breathing and the doctor told me to go home and lay down. I drove to another hospital, as I walked inn a doctor was walking through the lobby, saw me and said quick, get her in immediately, she's not getting any air in her airways."

"In junior year of high school I was enrolled in a program for high performing Black and Brown students. To remain in the program, we were compelled to decide on our college majors in a limited set of areas that would put us on course for a limited set of professional choices. I wanted to be a pediatrician at the time but the “Health Sciences” option allowed only for nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy and occupational therapy"

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